A Day at the Denver Botanical Gardens

I began the trip to the Denver Botanical Gardens in search of the huge and elusive Corpse flower but stumbled on to the horse art of sculpture Deborah Butterfield.  The artist has spent her career focused on horses and all they represent.  Her horses are at once representational, abstract and metaphorical.  Each is individual, often named for the artist's own horses or places of significance.  With the slightest gestural line, she is able to evoke an enormous presence that strikes a universal cord.  Over time, Butterfield's horse form became more abstracted and she began to incorporate found materials such as sticks, mud, metal and wood into her sculptures.  The ephemeral quality of these natural materials led her to bronze casting.  With one exception, the works you see in Deborah Butterfield's The Nature of Horses are bronze sculptures cast from her original wooden assemblages--an amazing fool-the-eye technique.  The exhibit is on display in the Denver Botanical Garden until October 18, 2015.
{taken from the Denver Botanic Gardens brochure.}

The Corpse Flower, {Amorphophallus titans}
began blaming yesterday, August 20, 2015.
It was the first time that this 15 year old plant
bloomed.  Their first bloom can be anywhere
from 8-20 years old.  It blooms for 24-48
hours and the smell has been described like
rotting flesh.  Today it was dissipating,
but one of the guides said he has to wear
a gas mask yesterday.
These are the related plants to the Corpse flower


The corpse flower is from the Indonesian island of 
Sumatra and its habitat is under threat.  In just the last
35 years, 50% of the Indonesian rainforest has
disappeared due to logging and the cultivation
of palm oil.  The pollen from this flower will be
taken to the Corpse flower in the Chicago Botanic
Gardens.









See all the photos from the Denver Botanical Gardens at Facebook.com/TMS

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